CALLING ALL #DIEGO COLLECTORS

Deadline for submission for the coming book “Artist of a Thousand Faces” is this Saturday May 24, 2020 (we extended the deadline because of the overwhelming responses to DVP).

But, DVP still wants to catalog all Diego Voci works, so send yours in anyway. diegovociproject@gmail.com

(f yours is super, super, maybe it could pre-empt a lesser work in the book, if you hurry)

DIEGO & NAFFOUJ IN A TIME MACHINE

Destination Urbino, Italy! Internationally collected artist Antonio Diego Voci (1920-1985), in 1978 journeyed to Urbino, the birthplace of RAPHAEL 500 years ago!!!  https://diegovociproject.wordpress.com/2020/04/11/raphael-500th-death-anniversary/

The goal was be immersed in the aura of centuries of creative genius.  Diego did at least 9 high quality paper lithographs on stone.  One is “Le Couple” chosen now to be “considered” for the 3rd book about Diego to be published by Stephen Max titled “Artist of a Thousand Faces”.  ( A worldwide search is in progress to find unique faces by Diego for his 100th Anniversary) https://diegovociproject.wordpress.com/2020/04/15/planning-stages-and-you-can-be-featured/

Diego Voci; “Le Couple” Tempera with Gold Leaf 65 x 65cm

Diego’s widow, Helga Voci, has a few of “Le Couple” available https://www.diegovociproject.com/product-page/title-le-couple.  The original was purchased for the Cooprider Family Collection https://www.artworkarchive.com/profile/cooprider-family-collection/collections

#RAPHAEL! 500TH DEATH ANNIVERSARY

Raphael, Self-portrait, between 1504 and 1506, tempera on panel, Uffizi Gallery, Florence

“The Eternal Importance of Raphael!” And DIEGO

April 6, 2020 marked the 500th death anniversary of one of art history’s greats. Does Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino sill carry relevance today?

Read here to learn more: https://www.mutualart.com/Article/The-Eternal-Importance-of-Raphael-/9E91313BC9AEC73D?source_page=Magazine

Internationally collected artist (100th Birthday) Antonio Diego Voci (VOH-chee) 1920-1985 traveled to (Raphael’s birthplace) Urbino, Italy during his career as an artist.

As Diego’s acclaim grew, he ventured into publishing another series of prints handmade on special lithostones in [Raphael’s birthplace] Urbino, Italy in 1979, financed by Naffouj Gallery.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Diego_Voci

Helga Voci, widow to Diego Voci, shares:

In 1979 we had gone to Urbino, Italy where Diego made a series of very beautiful Lithographs. They were handmade on special litho stones. We stayed there for about 10 days and it was very hard work.

TWO #CHRIST PORTRAITS BY DIEGO VOCI

Diego Voci; Christo 19 1/2″ x 15 3/4″ #113896 Oil on Fiberboard

the first (above) an oil painting from the collection of Coop Cooprider, Diego Voci Historian. The second (below), a wonderful pastel, is from the collections of Christine Khan, Diego’s German agent for Germany from 1972 until after his death in 1985. Easter was a reverent occasion for Voci family in Gasperina, Italy. https://www.artifactcollectors.com/diego-voci-antonio-diego-voci-3984818/Page18.html#121380

Diego Voci; Face of Christus # 261-448 15 1/3″ x 11 1/4″

4 DIEGO VOCI TREASURES FOUND AT ESTATE SALE – NUMBER 2

Diego never left the significance of his religious upbringing far behind. Diego carries it with him throughout his life in his artistic creations, sometimes quite obvious and intended, sometimes more subtly hidden. Tom Catron now owns this masterpiece:ALLTAG for POST w Title et al 6 APR 2018

ALLTAG” shown above presents the observer with the every-day activities of a little town (“Alltag” = every day life) in rich colors, details of the mundane which give them another day to look forward too. Going to market, catching up on the town news, sitting in a café, having lunch, or simply walking about.

If you look closely, to the top right, take note of the small alcove which houses a religious figure holding something in its arms. Two things come to mind, which DIEGO so wonderfully rendered: Saint Antonio (Diego’s namesake) with baby Jesus and/or Mother and Child. Cleverly tucked away, DIEGO places the alcove with heartfelt intent.

Diego captured every day activities because he could relate to them. His matriarch grandmother Messina Arcangela and the family were devout Catholics. As a young boy with his father in Rome, Diego arrived at home only to carve his first small religious artifact since he’d seen one in a shop window. Read more of Diego’s Biography by Coop Cooprider, Diego Voci Historian since 1973:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Diego_Voci

Diego also sincerely depicts “Mother and Child” (“Maternité”) in hundreds of paintings and other media, as well as artworks of monks and Christ. Religion was simply part of  Antonio DIEGO Voci’s every day life: “ALLTAG”. See more on DIEGO and his family on our Pinterest Boards: https://www.pinterest.com/diegovoci/

Do you have a DIEGO VOCI artwork to share with us? Write us: diegovociproject@gmail.com

See NUMBER ONE from the Estate Auction in South Dakota, which Tom happened to attend, never having known of Antonio DIEGO Voci (1920-1985) at all!  He does now!https://diegovociproject.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/diego-voci-treasure-found-at-estate-sale/

 

Happy 97th Birthday Innocenzo! Who?

Why would someone change their middle name to “Diego“?  Google “Diego” and you get results for San Diego, Diego Rivera, Go Go Diego, children’s character.  Antonio Diego Voci changed his middle name to Diego.  Google Antonio Diego Voci, click on images and be amazed to view artworks by “Diego” Voci.

“#Diego” as he wanted the world to know him, rejected his birth middle name “Innocenzo”.  Being the youngest of three boys by fifteen years, that sweet little newborn was the picture of innocence (Italian: innocenza). Diego wanted to be seen as anything but innocent.  The family pet childhood name “Toto” was enough to bear. “Diego told me he never liked his middle name,” said Helga Drössler Voci, wife. “Innocenzo” is conspicuous by its official document absence in Diego’s life. Innocenzo was discovered only on his birth certificate (see below). After that it is “Antonio Voci” until 1976 when “Diego” is slipped into a government document.” – Antonio Diego Voci Wikipedia 

1920 August VOCI Antonio Innocenzo Birth Certificate Gasperina, Italy Resized

“In 1976, the metamorphosis of Diego for his middle name was completed by Diego on at least one official document when he registered residence in Taunusstein (by Wiesbaden) at the time he and Helga purchased their first and last home and studio. The name is “Antonio Diego Voci”, finally official recognition of Diego on a government document” (see below)

1976 March 31 Taunusstein Residence Permit includes DIEGO name Resized

 

Memories of Diego Voci by Widow Helga

The Diego Voci Project is gathering “everyday moments” of Diego.

We posted a series of questions on Artifact Collectors to help us learn more about Diego.  http://www.artifactcollectors.com/diego-voci-antonio-diego-voci-3984818/Page17.html#115141

Helga Voci in Germany, responded.  She is the widow of internationally collected artist Diego Voci (1920-85).  Helga shares with us her behind the scenes life with Diego.

What would Diego say when he was smoking a cigarette? (2 packs a day, unfiltered)
“Diego said never anything when he smoked, he enjoyed his cigarettes, and he only got mad when me or somebody else would criticize for smoking so much. He smoked all over, in the house, in the car, at a friends’ house.”

DIEGO with cigarette in hand

Would Diego say anything after a first sip of wine? “Wine was fine for him, but he would never drink more than 1 or 2 glasses, after dinner only espresso and water.”

What would Diego say when he was frustrated with a painting? What would he do? Would he stop and say something or did he gesture a frustration?  “When Diego was frustrated with a painting he would put it aside and finish it later.”

What were the first words out of Diego’s mouth when a potential collector came thru the door?  “Diego was always friendly and very pleased when somebody would come through the door, a customer or just friend, he always liked to have guests in the house, we always said-we have an open house.”

What were the first words out of Diego’s mouth when Diego put down his paint brush and knew a painting was done?  “When a painting was done, he would put it away and it did not interest him anymore, he was only interested in a white canvas, so he could start again.”

Foto0120 Christiane Hauk (2)

What were the first words out of Diego’s mouth when he sold a painting?  “Diego did not get so much excited when he sold a painting, he knew he needed the money to pay the bills, but money did not really interest him, he wanted a good life, nice Restaurants, Holidays, good Hotels, pay his bills, the house, etc.  But he never was interested to shevel money, he did not care, as long as I had a comfortable life and Alessandra had everything she needed, everything was fine.”

What would Diego say over and over and over again to Alessandra?  “He always would say to Alessandra “Pallina mia” (little ball), he loved her very much, he would go to Italy once a year and buy beautiful dresses, coats and shoes in expensive boutiques for her, this was his biggest pleasure, he would buy everything what she wanted.”

DIEGO, Joy & Alessandra in St. Tropez, France 1977

Helga, what slipped into Diego’s voice to keep you calm, “quote” in his words? “To me he would say: Tutto bene (everything all right), non aver paura (don`t worry), and stai calma (be quiet, there are no problems).”

Diego__and_Helga

Diego Collectors, share your memories with us at diegovociproject@gmail.com.

 

 

Magnetism of Diego Never Loses Power

In this case it was quiet power of women, who make the world hold together.  The words of collector Stanley & Sibylle Wilcox follow this Diego image.

Diego Original

Stanley Wilcox shares with the Diego Voci Project:

“The title of this next piece is titled “Bauer bei der Ernte” (Farmers at Harvest). It measures 60 x 80 centimeters without the frame. When we first saw this large oil, my wife Sibylle and I were deeply moved by the labored facial expression of the woman standing in the foreground holding what appears to be a grain basket, and the other woman bending over a large half barrel basket with a cloth grain sack. It depicts honor and respect to hard working women in what I believe to be a childhood memory in a rural setting near to where Diego was born in Gasperina, Calabria, Italy.

Hand harvesting wheat was and still is practiced on small family farms in this region. (See interesting reference article and 1950’s/60’s photo posted at Scordo.com – Italian Food Recipes and Lifestyle: “The Wheat Harvest and Memory: Returning to Calabria”.)

Note that an almost identical scene is depicted in the background, strengthening the paintings depth and visually balancing the piece. The men are outnumbered 2 to 1 and are merely serving the role of overseeing the harvest in what I interpret as diminished supervisory capacity influenced by the overwhelming endurance of these women.”

Visit the Diego Voci Project at www.diegovociproject.com to learn more about Diego.